General

Snowmageddon Tale

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Todays Saga...

Began with a stop at the Co-Op Feed store in Everett. They made quick work of loading about 700 pounds of feed for Rick’s animals.

Stocking up...

Since it is not far from my house I said that I would be happy to pick it up and deliver it for him.

“Turn off the paved road!”

The neighborhood is filled with some intense hills. The truck handled amazing on the way in, however for the final hill I turned on the 4 wheel drive. I heard a pop of sorts as the truck lost its traction and began to slide rapidly back down the hill. I frantically shifted from 1st gear to reverse while trying to steer the slide and with a swish the drivers side went into the ditch.

A Delightful Sight...

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The track hoe was huge! Just what my beast of at truck, a 4x4 Crew Cab Dually Diesel, was going to need. He pulled me out of the ditch and anchored me as I backed down to safety. We loaded the feed into the “Wonder Buggy” to make the trip to the barn.

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Since I was having a terrible time with traction it was time pull out the chains. The Wonder Buggy returned and after we chained up the front and the outside duals I headed onward and upward.

Slip Sliding Away...

There was several inches of snow over an icy surface from the past storm. As soon as you crush the new snow, the texture acts like water on top of ice. A long straight climb came to a halt for my Jolly Green Giant.

Get a Move On…

It was important to get off the hill, so I backed up to get traction, rolling forward slowly, rocking the rig forward and back to get some momentum, accelerating quickly, trying to steer to the side, different gears, and 4x4 settings. Nope still stuck.

Pretty soon there are trucks trying to come down the hill, and trucks behind me trying to go up, and me a stuck in the muck, in the middle.

The next hour...

Included the neighbors digging into the gravel road and breaking off small branches and spreading sand to provide traction for my tires. Bouncing on the tailgate while driving.

The rescue truck they brought down...got its slide on, so they could not tow me up. In order to gain more traction they let some air out of the tires of that rig. I was not comfortable doing that with my dual wheels, as squishy Duallys that touch each other can cause a blowout.

We discovered that my 4 wheel drive is not working and seemed to contribute to the traction control issues. The truck was in my opinion over reactive, however when we put it back into 2 wheel drive it settled down. The joy and relief that I felt as I followed it up the hill, was huge.

It Takes a Village...

These amazing neighbors treated me like one of their own. The energy that they put in to each idea was astounding. Thank you for getting me and my Jolly Green Giant back on the road and home to my family this evening.

Today We Used…

A tow strap and chain, 2 pairs of tire chains, a bungie cord, 100 pounds of sand, 350 pounds of rocks between the wheel wells, rocks to use as wheel chocks, plywood for a smooth surface, shovel, assorted tools, gloves, and a flashlight hat…lots of ideas!

Traction is a Tricky Thing...

We like to compare the depth of the snow to decide if it is safe to travel. But many times it is the texture of the snow, compact snow and ice, water, slush on each surface that makes or breaks your rigs ability to connect with the road. Ad into that equation the specific hills, and angles of the roadway. Followed by factoring in the shade in a given area and the temperature at the time you are travelling.

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Your traction may also be directly affected by the way the snow began. Was the road covered in rain that froze first? Did the snow fall on top of a sheet of ice, or does the snow actually connect to the grooves of the road.

Be Prepared, Be Safe, Stay Warm, and Thank You for the Help!

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Image Credit: Holly Ramsey

Dogs on the Job

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Dogs on the Job

Dogs are on the job in the Courthouse providing support and encouragement. Their presence is giving some people the confidence to tell their story, and face the difficult, and daunting task of recounting a traumatic experience. 

Canines for More Than Cops

We have seen many kinds of service dogs in our world giving back to the community.  The concept of Courthouse Dogs was pioneered in 2003 right here in Washington State.  A King County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney working in Seattle came up with this tool for the Courthouse as the result of a trip to Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) with her son. 

Raise Your Right Paw

In December of 2004, Deputy Prosecutor Page Ulrey entered training with “Ellie”.  They went through an extensive training program before graduating and returning home to King County to become what is believed to be the first official Courthouse dog.  

Working Like a Dog

Courthouse dogs are in the business of providing emotional support with a soft look, a listening ear, an understanding wag, and comforting snuggle when needed.   They work several days a week assisting with witness statements and calming others in the high stress environment of the courtroom.

When in the courtroom you need to speak in public which is difficult.  Added to this stress is recounting the truth of possibly one your hardest days. Having a dog with you is like having an old friend there to help making it easier to talk, to remember, and to experience less anxiety.

Going to the Dogs

While it may seem surprising to see a courtroom going to the dogs, the results seem to be in the dogs favor.  They are a positive influence in allowing the truth to be heard so that justice may be upheld.

Atta Dog

We want to thank local members of this community who raise and train puppies to prepare them for many different acts of service.  Thank you to the trainers who work tirelessly to perfect these dogs specialized skills. Thank you to the partners who know and love these dogs best and put their services to work. Thank you to the Courts for Going to the Dogs! 

Give us a call

If you find yourself in an unfortunate situation facing the judge, please don’t hesitate to give Rick a call.  He is an experienced Criminal Defense attorney and has been handling Criminal cases since 1992.

If you’ve just been pulled over or have been cited with a Criminal charge and would like Rick to represent you - give us a call  or drop us an email, we’ll get right back to you.

If you have any questions at any time throughout the process you can always call and ask the office - we are more than happy to help.

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The Do's and Don'ts of Motorcycles

It is summertime, and with summertime comes sunshine and motorcycles.  Motorcycles are great way to enjoy this wonderful weather.  However, there are extra steps a Washington State licensed driver needs to take to ensure he or she is within the rules of the road.

How to Get an Endorsement

According the Washington State Department of Licensing, to legally ride a motorcycle you are required to obtain a 2-wheel motorcycle or 3-wheel sidecar/trike you must have an endorsement on your driver’s license or obtain a motorcycle instruction permit to learn how to ride on public roadways.  There are two ways to obtain an endorsement you are required to successfully complete a motorcycle safety course at a Washington State Department of Licensing approved motorcycle training school or you can pass the knowledge and riding skills test at an approved motorcycle training school.  To obtain a motorcycle instruction permit you are required to pass the knowledge test at an approved training school.

Requirements for a Motorcycle Endorsement

If you have a 2-wheel motorcycle or scooter that has an engine larger than 50cc or can exceed speeds of 30 mph you are required to have 2-wheel motorcycle endorsement.  If the engine is smaller than 50cc and has a maximum speed of 30 mph you are not required to have an endorsement.  You are required to have a 3-wheel endorsement if your 2-wheel motorcycle has a stabilizing conversion kit installed, if your motorcycle has a sidecar, or if your motorcycle is considered a 3-wheel trike.  If you ride your motorcycle without the proper endorsements or without a permit your running the risk of receiving a costly traffic ticket for no motorcycle endorsement, as well as your motorcycle or trike could be impounded.

Helmet Laws

Along with the motorcycle endorsement that you are required to have on your license you are also required to wear a motorcycle helmet.  According the Washington State Patrol you are required to wear a motorcycle helmet when riding a motorcycle or motorcycle trike.  The helmet has to be certified by the manufacturer as meeting the United States Department of Transportation standards outline in 49 CFR 571.218.  A helmet that meets the standards required by the Department of Transportation will have a sticker on the back and will have information on the inside of the helmet that includes manufacturer name, helmet model, and size.  If you are caught riding a motorcycle or trike without wearing a helmet you could receive a costly traffic ticket for not wearing a helmet that could appear on your driving record.

Give us a Call

If you find yourself in the unfortunate situation of receiving a traffic infraction, please don’t hesitate to give Rick a call.  He is an experienced traffic attorney and has been handling traffic violation cases since 1992.

If you’ve just been pulled over and would like Rick to represent you - give us a call  or send us an email, we’ll get right back to you.

If you have any questions at any time throughout the process you can always call and ask the office - we are more than happy to help.

Connect with us

Come and connect with us on social media.  If you use any of the networks below, we’d love to hear from you - come say hi.  We are active participants in the local community and share more than just legal information

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What is a CDL?

A commercial driving license, better known as a CDL, is a special license that is required by the Washington State Department of Licensing, for those drivers who drive any of the following types of vehicles:

 

  • Vehicles with a manufacturer's weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more

  • Trailers with a manufacturer’s weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more and a combined vehicles gross weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more

  • All vehicles designed to transport 16 or more persons including the driver

  • All school buses

  • Vehicles used to transport any material that requires a hazardous material placarding

The Washington State Department of Licensing has several useful links to help understand who is required to obtain a commercial driver's license.  There are several requirements that need to be met prior to obtaining a CDL.  

Possibilities of Losing Your CDL

What is important to understand that if you do have a commercial driver’s license and you find yourself in a situation where you have received a traffic ticket, you might be in jeopardy of losing your commercial driver’s license.  If your regular Washington State driver’s license has been suspended, revoked, cancelled, or surrendered for any reason your CDL, or commercial driver’s license can be suspended, revoked or disqualified.  A CDL suspension can come from committing 2 or more serious traffic offenses arising from separate incidents within a 3 year period of time.  Your commercial driver’s license could be disqualified to up to 120 days.  There are requirements that need to be met prior to being able to re-qualify for the commercial driver’s license which may include the knowledge and driving test, a $20.00 requalification fee, as well as a possibility of obtaining a letter from the Transportation Security Administration stating that you have passed their background check.

Protection is the Key

Once a driver has obtained a commercial driver’s license, protecting the license so it is not suspended, revoked, cancelled or surrendered is extremely important.  Rick is an experienced traffic attorney and helps protect those drivers who have commercial driver’s licenses.

If you have recently been pulled over and received a traffic ticket, and have a commercial driver’s license,  give us a call or email us. We will get right back to you. Rick has years of developed relationships with judges, prosecutors, and court clerks. Rick will do his best to help protect your commercial driver’s license.  

If you have any questions at any time throughout the process you can always call and ask the office - we are more than happy to help.

Connect with us

Come and connect with us on social media.  If you use any of the networks below, we’d love to hear from you - come say hi.  We are active participants in the local community and share more than just legal information

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